Safer-Sex-Unfall/PEP

Deutsche AIDS-Hilfe Hand mit Pillen

Foto: DAH

Es kann vorkommen, dass beim Safer Sex etwas schief geht. Kondome können zum Beispiel reißen oder abrutschen. Manchmal werden sie im Rausch der Gefühle auch einfach vergessen.

Wenn einer der Partner HIVpositiv ist, besteht dann die Möglichkeit, dass HIV übertragen wird. Panik ist in solchen Momenten aber fehl am Platz: Eine HIV-Infektion lässt sich mit hoher Wahrscheinlichkeit noch verhindern.

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Condoms For Safer Sex

Condoms work by forming a barrier between the penis and anus, vagina, or mouth. The barrier keeps one partner’s fluids from getting into or on the other. And condoms reduce the amount of skin-to-skin contact. There are two main kinds of condoms — latex condoms and female condoms.

How to Put On A Condom

  • Latex condoms are great safer sex tools for anal or vaginal intercourse. They are easy to get at a pharmacy, grocery store, or at a Planned Parenthood health center. They are cheap. And they come in a variety of shapes, sizes, and textures. You can learn how to put on a condom by watching this brief film.
  • People with latex allergies can use condoms made of polyurethane. They also make sex safer, but they are not as widely available as latex condoms.
  • Female condoms reduce your risk of infection, too. Female condoms aren’t quite as easy to find as latex condoms, but they are available in some drugstores and many Planned Parenthood health centers. You can also order them online if you can’t find them in your neighborhood. Follow the instructions on the package for using female condoms correctly.

Source:  Planned Parenthood

Safer Sex (“Safe Sex”) at a Glance

Reduces our risk of getting a sexually transmitted disease (STD)
Using condoms makes vaginal or anal intercourse safer sex
Using condoms or other barriers makes oral sex safer sex
Having sex play without intercourse can be even safer sex
Safer sex can be very pleasurable and exciting

How Can I Lower My Risk Using Safer Sex?

One way to have safer sex is to only have one partner who has no sexually transmitted infections and no other partners than you. But, this isn’t always the safest kind of safer sex. That’s because most people don’t know when they have infections. They are very likely to pass them on without knowing it.

Another other reason is that some people aren’t as honest as they should be. In fact, about 1 out of 3 people will say they don’t have an infection when they know they do, just to have sex. So most of us have to find other ways to practice safer sex.

No-risk safer sex play includes:

Low-risk safer sex play includes:

  • kissing
  • fondling — manual stimulation of one another
  • body-to-body rubbing — frottage, “grinding,” or “dry humping”
  • oral sex (even safer with a condom or other barrier)
  • playing with sex toys — alone or with a partner

Highest risk sexual activities include:

  • vaginal intercourse
  • anal intercourse

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How Different Sexually Transmitted Infections Get Passed Along
Infections are passed in different ways. Here are the basics:

VAGINAL OR ANAL INTERCOURSE WITHOUT A CONDOM — HIGH RISK FOR PASSING

ORAL SEX WITHOUT A CONDOM — HIGH RISK FOR PASSING

  • CMV
  • gonorrhea
  • hepatitis B
  • herpes
  • syphilis

SKIN-TO-SKIN SEX PLAY WITHOUT SEXUAL INTERCOURSE — RISKY FOR PASSING

  • CMV
  • herpes
  • HPV
  • pubic lice
  • scabies

Lots of other infections, from the flu to mononucleosis, can also be passed during sex play.

Source:  Planned Parenthood